Not invisible any more – a courageous journey to change the world!

We sometimes speak as if caring did not require knowledge –  as if caring for someone is simply a matter of good intentions or warm regard. But to care, I must understand the other’s needs and must be able to respond properly to them – and clearly good intentions do not guarantee this. To care for someone, I must know many things.”

Milton Mayeroff

Yes – to care for someone, I must know many things!

I have the privilege of teaching our care teams in our Independent, Assisted Living, and Memory Care communities in the United States about how to embark on a courageous journey to change the world by embracing and evoking their power as educated caregivers.

Let’s make the invisibility of care visible as we gain specialized knowledge about human development.

Invisibility of Care 

The deep assumption about caring is that it is something anyone can do, but we do not take care of human beings the same way we take care of a house or a lawn!  We must know many things.

The way we touch others increases or diminishes their self-worth.

  • The sensations of the body are the pathways to intellect and emotions. Caring routines involve engagement around bodily functions (elimination, cleaning, eating, sleeping) and therefore they hold the most intimate importance.
  • In the past, caring tasks may have been viewed as custodial. In the emerging future, care is viewed as an honorable practice that requires specialized knowledge about human development.
  • When we see the other as competent and capable, we practice caring as a conversation — a reciprocal exchange.  We find ourselves doing things “with” others instead of doing them “to” others.  We engage in relationship-planning rather than care-planning.
  • We view care as a practice that nurtures another’s development, actualization, and self-sufficiency. This is the opposite of caring in a way that creates helplessness, frustration, dependency, or entanglement.
  • Caring is associated with strength and power — not passivity or weakness. The other feels his or her wholeness in our caring response.

Caring and being cared for can give meaning to our lives

I believe that caring plays a much bigger role in our lives than you might think. The experience of caring can ‘shape us’, and help create order and stability in our own lives.

  • Knowing – “I must understand the other’s needs and be able to respond properly’” and “I must know what my own powers and limitations are”.
  • Alternating rhythms – Moving back and forth between a narrower and a wider framework- at times focusing on the detail, at others on the wider picture; sometimes doing, sometimes doing nothing; always watching and seeking feedback on those actions/inactions.
  • Patience – “I must enable the other to grow in their own time and in their own way –  giving the other room to live.”
  • Honesty – This means being open to oneself and to others – seeing others as they really are and seeing myself as I really am.
  • Trust –  Trusting the other is to let go; it includes an element of risk and a leap into the unknown, both of which take courage.
  • Humility – There is always something more to learn. Through caring, I come to a truer appreciation of my limitations as well as my powers.
  • Hope – Through caring, the carer instills hope into the relationship.
  • Courage – a carer needs courage because, as with any relationship, this is largely a journey into the unknown.

Caring is what makes us human.  By educating ourselves and claiming the power we have to grow and impact others – we each have an opportunity to evolve into powerful change agents to be part of a movement creating a caring world.  Let’s take this courageous journey as super-caregivers!


jean-garboden
Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean Garboden is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living in Eugene, Oregon. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada

Engaging Aging – BE WISE, BE WELL

Americans are living longer these days due to technology and advances in medicine. We have been gifted with 30 more years of life than our parent’s generation.    We are more educated about healthy living, and it is a choice we can make as we enter into elderhood.

Do illness and aging always go hand-in-hand? The answer is a surprising, but resounding, NO.

It is never too early or too late to get more active or revamp your diet. It is not a matter of training for a marathon or giving up entire food groups, either. Small things can lead to huge differences in the way you feel and the way your body works. Although you should always consult with your doctor before making changes, there are easy steps you can take toward overall wellness—regardless of your age.

Be Wise, Be Well

  • Start slowly. If you have not been exercising, choose something low-impact that you can do a little at a time. Walk for ten minutes in the morning and the afternoon. Sign up for a Tai Chi class, or learn some gentle stretches.
  • Exercising is less of a chore when you do it with people you enjoy. Involving others will also hold you accountable. Gather a group of friends or join a class that offers what you are looking for. Most senior and community centers offer free or low-cost options.
  • Activity is important, but nutrition is equally vital. Keep an honest record of what you eat to see how you are doing. If you have a condition like diabetes, always consult your doctor before changing your diet. Nutritionists are another excellent resource, whether you have special dietary needs or not.
  • Wellness is a matter of body and mind. Eating healthy foods and staying active may reduce risks to your brain’s health. Do even more by learning new things and exercising your mind. Try reading, playing games, taking a class, or simply being social.

Your Health

A big part of the new way to age is a focus on physical and mental wellness.  In recognition and celebration of Older Americans Month  #OAM18! We are sharing these resources with you.  Educate yourself – Be wise.  Be well.
What is Brain Health
National Institutes on Aging

Healthy Eating As We Age
USDA

Go4Life
National Institute on Aging

Falls Prevention
National Council on Aging

Long-term Care Planning
Department of Health and Human Services

Mouth Healthy Initiative
American Dental Association

Sleep and Aging
National Institutes of Health 


Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living in Eugene, Oregon. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada

Engage YOUR way! Age Boldly!

Redefine Your Age

In our support of the 2018 theme “Engage at Every Age,”  we join the  Administration for Community Living (ACL) to celebrate Older Americans Month (OAM) to recognize older Americans for their contributions to the nation.

We are redefining every age of our lives. All of us are.  Twenty-year-olds today are not where I was at twenty. They are in a very different world. So how can we say that we’re not different from previous generations?  Are we a different kind of sixty – or seventy – or eighty-year-old?  Yes.  We are!

So I’m just hoping for myself and for the women and men around me that we continue learning and growing and reimagining our lives.  As long as I’m learning and evolving every day of my life, I will never feel useless or worn out. Never.  And  I feel in my head and in my heart ageless!

When we use the term anti-aging, we’re subtly reinforcing the message that aging is a condition we need to battle.  No, it is a condition we need to embrace!  Aging is inevitable for everyone.  Age boldly!


Reinvent yourself

Many people are redefining aging by trying new careers, classes, and hobbies.

A former prisoner of war in Japan, John Lowe realized a lifelong ambition when he took up ballet at the age of 79. By the time he approached his 90th birthday, Lowe was dancing professionally, rehearsing at his local dance school three times a week and practicing at home every day to stay in shape.

“Find something that will completely change your life,” he recommends. “Ballet enables me to keep my spine straight and to trick time!

 

89-year-old Daphne Selfe is the world’s oldest professional fashion model: she grew up during the second world war and has been gracing magazine covers since 1949. “Less of the ‘old’ please, I’m still a teenager inside!” she says.

 

Sitting at a desk alongside two of his grandchildren, Kimani Maruge first attended school in 2004 at the age of 84. He was taking advantage of a decision by the Kenyan government to introduce free primary schooling. In 2005, Maruge boarded a plane for the first time and traveled to New York to address the UN World Summit on the importance of free education. Maruge died in 2009, and older people in Africa have been going to school ever since.

Negative stereotypes are rampant in our society.  We’ve come out of the punk generation and the hippie generation – which was all about societal changes and individualism.  And now this aging generation is struggling with a sort of invisibility that society has thrust upon us simply because we are older.

Perceptions are changing though. The more we read about and meet older people making contributions and living joyfully, the more acceptable it will be for older people to remain a part of society.  Baby boomers have not seen previous older generations grasp at opportunities, so they have few good role models,  We  need to start developing some positive role models!

So-called ‘olderpreneurs’ is one place to talk about changing society’s perception of older people.  After all, age discrimination does not exist if you are your own boss!  The data below is from the Business Insider. 

  • The highest rate of entrepreneurial activity  in the United States in the past 10 years has been among 55 to 64 years old.
  • More than 1 in 3 new business were started by an entrepreneur over age 50.
  • Benjamin Franklin was 76 when he invented the bifocal.

Age Your Way

Many people are redefining aging and embracing their creative passions.  Here are some resources provided in celebration of May 2018 Older Americans Month.  #OAM18!

Click on this link for  a tip sheet for reinventing your life!

Arts and Aging Toolkit for Organizations
CreativeAging.org

Directory of Creative Aging Programs
National Center for Creative Aging

Participating in Activities You Enjoy
National Institute on Aging

Ready for Your Second Career?
AARP Bulletin

Senior Community Service Employment Program
Department of Labor

 

 


Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living in Eugene, Oregon. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada

 

 

 

 

Older Americans Month – Engage at every age: May 2018

Every May, the Administration on Aging, part of the Administration for Community Living, leads our nation’s observance of Older American’s Month.

The 2018 theme, Engage at Every Age, emphasizes that you are never too old (or young) to take part in activities that can enrich your physical, mental, and emotional well-being. It also celebrates the many ways in which older adults make a difference in our communities.

Participating in activities that promote mental and physical wellness, offering your wisdom and experience to the next generation, seeking the mentorship of someone with more life experience than you—those are just a few examples of what being engaged can mean. No matter where you are in your life, there is no better time than now to start. We hope you will join in and Engage at Every Age!

Giving Back

More than ever, older adults are making a difference—for themselves and in communities—through civic engagement.  Check out these opportunities to celebrate the power and exhilaration of elderhood by giving back!

Create the Good
AARP

Experience Corps
AARP Foundation

Doing Good is Good for You: Volunteer (PDF)
n4a

SeniorCorps
Corporation for National and Community Service

Volunteer Opportunity Search Tool
VolunteerMatch


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Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living in Eugene, Oregon. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada

 

Delivering Happiness – recreating marvelous memories

An estimated 5.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s or other dementias. At home or in senior housing communities, creating beautiful, vibrant, and active cultures where those who have cognitive loss can live with joy and purpose is important.

We believe that those who have memory loss can participate as fully capable people in an environment where the mind, body, spirit, and soul is stimulated – promoting physical and mental wellness.

In our senior housing communities, we are creating LivingMemories™ nooks in our Memory Support Neighborhoods.  We recognize that elders do not live in our work-space.  We work in their living space.

We decided to design living spaces to evoke memories of home life, work life, and creative endeavors. These spaces encourage the elders to self-direct their own lives as they remember and practice routines or life skills that were previously part of their daily lives. The team member role is a trusted friend and family support when needed.

We have seen first-hand men and women in the nursery nurturing dolls as their remembered babies. It is heart-warming as they dress them, feed them, change their diapers, and even sleep with them at night.  The parent and/or grandparent role is validated, inspiring a sense of purpose, love, and belonging.

What we’ve noticed with the nursery nook is that those who haven’t talked in a while are now talking; and in one instance, a person who was anxious, agitated, and refusing food is now eating.  Dorothy has been known to wander and exit seek. She has now found purpose and love by taking care of her “baby” in the nursery – often sitting for hours rocking the baby.

Dottie, who loves all things that sparkle, is often found smiling while at the beauty nook trying on items from the collection and showing them off to other elders, families, and care teams.

When I visit our Memory Support Neighborhoods, my heart sings as I watch the care teams entering the home of these elders and begin delivering happiness.

I see a young care team member learning alongside an elder craftsman Ruben, at a workbench. Another care team member is offering to babysit for the mothers and the grandmothers so they could tidy up the nursery.  A caring Administrator purchases flowers for Don, an avid gardener, and listens to him explain to her the proper way to plant and grow beautiful flowers.  Geraldine, once an FBI agent sits at her desk to review the daily schedule, telling me that she is in charge of making sure the employees wear their name tags.  Francesca, a pianist is playing piano at the music station as Adele dances.  We are unique.  Our team members truly work as a family unit to create and support a sense of purpose, love and belonging, self-esteem, safety, and home.

Our care teams are delivering happiness – and receiving it too!

Life station music francesca

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Candis Willis, To learn more  email     cwillis@compass-living.com

About the author: Candis Willis is the Director of Operations for the Southwest Region for Compass Senior Living. Candis lives in Redding, California. She started working with seniors in 1995 as a floor nurse and has spent her career working with elders in many different capacities, from admission coordinator to administrator. The best part of this work for her is connecting with residents and seeing them flourish in life when they thought life would be over because of leaving their homes. She loves having the opportunity each day to give back to them what they have given to so many others. In addition to being a nurse, Candis also holds a Bachelors Degree in Psychology and is a licensed administrator in California, Idaho, and New Mexico.

 

 

Edith, Denise, and Me – “I live every day like it is the FIRST day of my life!”

 

As I travel around the country, my greatest pleasure is connecting with elders living in our communities.  If the community has an available apartment I stay as a guest. I visited Majestic Rim Retirement Community in Payson Arizona and met Denise and Edith.  I recorded Denise and Edith’s stories for our Tiny Stories™ program and then Edith invited us to go hot-tubbing. We laughed as Edith showed us how she could still raise her feet above her head.

As we soaked in the hot tub we shared stories and talked about life.  Edith said, “You know, I believe in life before death.”   I said, “Really, tell me more!”  She shared more of her personal stories of both hardship and joy.  Edith reflected that life is a journey of mountaintops and valleys.  She said living in the present is the key.

“Today is the day where we have a choice to find our happiness.”  She said, “I live each day like it is the first day of the rest of my adventure!”

The next day, I hugged Edith and thanked her.   I told her that her life-example had a profound effect on me.

As I left Arizona to go home, I pondered my own life.  Living each day like it is my FIRST means not looking back with regret and  wishing  I ‘would have’ or ‘could have.’   I recognized I was free to continually reach out to newer, richer, deeper, life-changing experiences.

As human beings, we are most fully alive when we are changing and growing and stretching our boundaries in our quest to be all we are meant to be physically, spiritually, emotionally, and intellectually.  Edith, in her 9th decade, was living a vibrant, joyful, generous, and adventurous life every day.

My short visit with Edith and Denise was a big ‘aha’ for me!  Yes, life-affirming words from a wise. sassy, beautiful elder.


Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean Garboden is the Director of Education and Innovation at Compass Senior Living, located in Eugene Oregon. Jean is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada

Never too late to fall in love

“You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.” ~ Albert Einstein

Jerry Morris moved to Peachtree Village in Roswell, New Mexico in March of 2015, he was from Alamogordo New Mexico and was not too crazy about moving to Roswell where he felt like he was giving up his independence.  His daughter lives in Roswell and for various reasons, she felt like having her father closer would be great.

Jerry adjusted to living in a community setting and he was enjoying the benefits Peachtree had to offer –  from planting a community garden, tending to hens, even placing first in the  Eastern New Mexico State Fair for  growing  the largest pumpkin.

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Betty and Jerry found love at Peachtree Village Retirement Community!

Little did Jerry know that he would find love again.

In the summer of 2017 a caregiver with Visiting Angels, Betty, walked into Peachtree Village and the rest is history.   Jerry and Betty formed a friendship which then quickly turned into something much more.

In December of 2017 Jerry popped the question and on January 3, 2018, they got married.

We always tell prospective residents and family members when they visit our community that this is a place where we encourage the residents to continue living their lives with the benefits of independence, purpose, concierge services, security, friendships, adventures– and yes, you might even find love here!


About the author:

Screen Shot 2018-02-14 at 9.26.07 AMMary Beth Lawrence is the Executive Director at Peachtree Village Retirement Community located in Roswell New Mexico, and a part of the Compass Senior Living family.    A graduate of New Mexico State University, and an excellent leader and businesswoman,  Mary Beth has a passion for elderhood and honoring and enriching the lives of seniors.  She has created a culture of mutual caring and respect, personal growth, and purpose for the residents and her team members.  Mary Beth is an inspiring example of a True North Leader,  guided by goodness, loyalty, faith, and fun.

 

Look Alzheimer’s in the eye this year.

Over the last few months our Director of Education and Innovation, Jean Garboden, and I have traveled to several of Compass’ senior living communities to conduct training we call Caring is What Makes Us Human: Empathetic communication with those who have dementia. Its evolved into a powerful and engaging series of stories that reflect the more than 10 years we’ve been working to try to understand dementia and finding a better way to care for those who have it. Our employees are required to attend. It’s those that are not required to attend that inspire me.

For several of the trainings, we’ve had elders and family members join us. In one recent session, I was inspired looking out at the elders’ faces that were engaged in the conversation. They were there because they wanted to be. They aren’t afraid of knowing what Alzheimer’s or other dementias can do. And, with their presence, they are facing it head-on. Elders are the ones that may see this daily amongst their peers and wonder, “am I next”? And yet, they were the ones most interested in learning about how they can care, or at least understand, what it means and how to help others.

These elders inspire me because they are engaging in the conversation that most are too afraid to have. They are arming themselves with the knowledge that will help to eliminate fear. They are building understanding that those with dementia are still there and they are whole human beings to be loved, not feared. They are showing us that age, impairments, and change are not to be feared, but understood and accepted. The elders that engage in this conversation are quiet ambassadors to making a better elderhood for the rest of us that will eventually be there.

Like cancer, the movement to find a cure for Alzheimer’s is growing because most of us know, or have known, someone with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. If you haven’t yet, you will. By learning about dementia and how we can still communicate with those who have it, you participate in the movement to change the language around “locked units”. These are not prisoners to be locked away. They are mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, daughters, sons, aunts, and uncles. They are in need of being safe and cared for, yes. But, they are not to be feared and avoided. They simply need us to look them in the eye, sing to them, dance with them, and know they still desire to be heard and understood.

As this new year starts please make a resolution that will make real change with one simple act. Resolve to learn more, participate in conversations, and try to understand Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Follow in these elders’ footsteps and learn what you can do to help just one individual. After all, caring is what makes us human.


About the Author:  

Photo on 9-7-17 at 4.53 PM

Amira T. Fahoum is the Director of Marketing and Director of Operations, Northwest Region for Compass Senior Living located  in Eugene, Oregon. Her path to senior living started when she simply decided to be open to possibilities in life. Possibilities are what led her to what is now a career in serving elders and families. Possibilities also led her into the world of becoming a Certified Eden Associate, Certified Validation Worker, Levels I and II, and a licensed Assisted Living Administrator in Oregon. On her journey with Compass, she has found true reward in working with, and for, the people that care for others.

Total-ity Awesome! looking back at 2017

“Sorrow looks back, worry looks around, faith looks up.”  Ralph Waldo Emerson

2017 was in many ways pretty tough, even violent – with the natural weather disasters and not-so-natural violence too.

But on  Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America was looking up. We were treated to an eclipse of the sun.

We have 21 Senior Housing Communities in 7 states.  Whether the eclipse was in the path of totality or not, our care teams and elders were looking up for a glimpse of this phenomena. Lots of people were looking up! Everyone in the contiguous United States, in fact, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa, and Europe saw at least a partial solar eclipse, while the thin path of totality passed through portions of 14 states – including Oregon and Illinois, where some of our communities are located.

We had the opportunity  firsthand to witness a celestial event so sublime that it’s been called “one of the most awe-inspiring spectacles in all of nature.” 

Looking back on 2017 – this day was one of the highlights of our shared experience! Elders and young people, families, and care team members stopped for a moment – looked up  into the heavens with awe, and felt connected to the goodness of one another, and the goodness of the universe.

Care team members in Illinois2_o

solar bration3_o

 

01 elders 9_o

 

Barb eclipse

 

00 elders looking up1_o

 

0 elder eclipse0_o

 

kids-01 at 9.17.19 AM

 

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Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean Garboden is the Director of Education and Innovation at Compass Senior Living, located in Eugene Oregon. Jean is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada

 

 

Tis’ the season to be gentle

Always be humble and gentle. Be patient with each other, making allowance for each other’s faults because of your love.


I was talking with a friend about the holiday season and the stress she is under this month caring for her mother-in-law, working extra hours as a nurse, living with a teenager who is having her own stress-points, shopping for gifts, wrapping them, preparing the menu for the Christmas meal, and more.

In the midst of this chaotic scene, she began to feel unappreciated and overwhelmed, and she lashed out at her husband, who is also feeling the stress of the season.  This ‘perfect storm’ of emotions was not pretty.   She loves her husband, her teen daughter, and her elder mother-in-law, and she even loves the ‘spirit of Christmas’.   This ugly emotional moment made her pause.   As she was sharing her story, I said, “Well, you know, Tis’ the season…”   With tears in her eyes, she said, “Yes, Tis’ the season to be gentle.”

Taking a moment – even a brief pause for self-reflection within a storm of criticism, harsh words, and blaming is good for the soul.   The fact is, my friend was not being gentle with herself.   She is a beautiful, kind, caring, empathetic person.

If self-care doesn’t come naturally, and as an empathetic caregiver you still insist on putting everything else before your own needs, you probably go into an over-serving mode during the holidays. You may go out of your way to make sure everything is ready, and everyone has the “best holiday ever.” Sound familiar?

Here are some simple ways to take a moment to pause for self-reflection and be gentle with yourself so you can be the very best version of your true self.

morning routine
Your morning routine might only be 5 minutes long to start, but even that will help. Use the time to sit quietly with a cup of tea, meditate, journal, or include other activities that feed your body, mind, heart, and soul.

take a walk
Go outside and take a short walk. Bundle up if it’s cold and head out with the intention of noticing the magic. Don’t worry about burning calories or tracking steps, just enjoy yourself.

laugh
Call or spend time with the person that makes you laugh harder than anyone else. Then laugh until you cry.

find the blessings in your messes
For some reason, we really like to beat ourselves up at the end of the year for all that we’ve done and left undone. Sometimes it takes a big heart-wrenching mess to wake us up, to inspire change, and to finally release us from the guilt of getting there in the first place. When our imperfections are splattered all over the floor, it becomes clear that we had to go through it, to get to the lessons, and then the enormous blessings.

apologize
Don’t worry about being right. No one wins that fight. If you can’t apologize for what happened, try “I’m sorry we aren’t as close as we were. Can we start over?” or “I’m sorry I hurt you.”

forgive
It’s not too late. Your forgiveness will not only heal their hearts, it will heal yours. P.S. You don’t need an apology to forgive someone.

say goodbye to guilt
Usually guilt is not guilt at all, but instead, it’s sadness that you couldn’t do more to help, disappointment that you didn’t achieve something you set out to do, or anger because you said “yes” to something that deserved a “no”.

breathe
Frustrated? Breathe in. Breathe out. Worried? Breathe in. Breathe out. Overwhelmed? Breathe in. Breathe out. Confused? Breathe in. Breathe out. Exhausted? Breathe in. Breathe out. Start there and you can often avoid over-thinking and over-reacting.

let go
There are benefits to moving through life, work, and relationships with a lighter step, a lighter look, and a lighter heart. If we want to be light, we have to let go.

be love
Instead of working so hard to please people, do it all, or control the world – just be love today.

Take care of yourself over the holidays and always. It’s the best gift you can give yourself and everyone you love.  Yes, it tis’ the season to be gentle!


jean-garboden
Jean Garboden, Director of Education & Innovation at Compass Senior Living

About the Author: Jean Garboden is the Director of Education and Innovation at Compass Senior Living, located in Eugene Oregon. Jean is an Elder Advocate and Eden Alternative Educator with over 30 years’ experience in not-for-profit and for-profit healthcare organizations. She is honored to lead the mission and values culture development for Compass Senior Living. Jean lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where she enjoys the weather and volunteers with the Nevadans for the Common Good, advocating for caregivers and elders in southern Nevada